Mississippi River Sediment Diversions Could Save Louisiana's Coast

Mississippi River Sediment Diversions Could Save Louisiana's Coast

Mississippi River Sediment Diversions Could Save Louisiana's Coast

 Engineers are working to help reconnect the Mississippi River to Louisiana’s sediment-starved wetlands in an effort to rebuild some of the land that is disappearing at a rate of almost 11,000 acres a year - or roughly a football field an hour. The $2.2-billion sediment diversion projects are the linchpin of Louisiana’s $50-billion coastal master plan, which aims to create 800 sq. miles of land over the next 50 years to help sustain 40% of the wetlands in the continental United States 

 Alden’s involvement in the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project was mentioned in a very interesting article in the August 9, 2018 Engineering News-Record (ENR).

 To support this project Alden is building a 220 ft. long by 70 ft. wide physical model simulating about 3 miles of the Mississippi River to evaluate water and sediment flow patterns at the proposed Mid Barataria Diversion.  Data from this model will be used to contribute to the detailed design process and used in conjunction with an extensive numeric modeling program.

 “We have been involved in the physical flow modeling of rivers and sediment deposition, scouring and transport processes for many years” says Andy Johansson, Director of Alden’s Hydraulic Modeling Group, “The Mid-Barataria project is where all of our knowledge in these areas is coming together. This will be one of the largest physical flow model ever built in Alden’s 120 year history.”

 You can find the entire article on ENR’s web site here: Mississippi River Diversions

 

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